Tag Archives: Feldenkrais

Holotropic Spontaneity and Carl Rogers XII

The Rogers ideas go very well with many further approaches to fine-tune.

Obviously the addition of moving chi kung or yoga, or both — anything that harmonises chi/prana/energy and promotes healthy strength/flexibility — is wise, and for someone planning on awakening Kundalini should go without saying. But one does not have to be too serious at first. I have always learned best by playing, as psychology predicts. Natural additions are acupressure, Jin Shin Jyutsu, 6 Healing Sounds etc. Sources are on the Reading Lists. I’ve always enjoyed a little Feldenkrais, a system with very interesting points to make on body-mind connection. Having someone else work on you now and then can be good too. This kind of purgation and harmonisation does on the energetic level precisely what Rogers-style awareness does on the identity level — allows flow and builds integrity.

A lot of people seem not to want to believe that something as simple as acupressure can profoundly relieve, say, depression. Find your points and they will make the point better than I can, especially if you’ve developed a little chi. This process is partly about pleasure, as the body becomes more comfortable in everyday life. Without getting into Epicureanism again, pleasure of this, let’s say, unproblematic kind can be a very important signal and guide. Happiness is no mere snare, and all of these methods do actually inculcate it in my experience, especially when one thinks in terms of regularly lowering stress over a period of time.

A Rogerian attitude emphasises not over-extending oneself and really listening to the body. Expanding to bigger challenges (which of course increase satisfaction) only after one is comfortable is the way of the person without much to prove, as opposed to he who attempts to scare death off with perfect asanas and ligament blowouts. (This was Glenn’s advice in the “thanatos” chapters of Martial Arts Madness, 1999.) A good diet and time spent in nature are valuable.

Since this series will be my last featuring normal-level psychology in any major way, as I move into more mystical territory, I’ll give greater depth in these following posts on helpful psychological ideas to couple with Rogers on the journey. Various experiences (or whims) may arise which need a specialised approach, but I doubt most people will need everything on the list, and certainly not all at once! Apologies if it seems over-long, but I want to give as much as I can that I know has value. Something might jump out as interesting, now or later. All of this does connect to the Kundalini work and that will become very clear too. Meanwhile treat it as optional and remember it all works with Rogers. Room only for one this week with more to come over the next few posts.

– Herbert Benson, the discoverer of the Relaxation Response, later came up with the Breakout Principle (2004), which uses processes like meditation and other forms of awareness to trigger spontaneous inspirations and answers to just about anything, without conscious processing. Of all these approaches I highly recommend experimenting with this one at some point, since essentially it is holotropic spontaneity in action. Experiencing it in this context makes it very easy to trust that spontaneity as a general process. The method involves letting go. It triggers genuine and delightful moments of enlightenment which can even be peak experiences. It even has neurochemistry attached.

The book is suitable for complete beginners; see two previous posts here and here for more.

[It is interesting to contemplate, after having a few of these inspirations, that meeting with their source is a great goal of spiritual practice. But that deeper question must wait for future series.]


Musings on Entrainment

Psychologically, let’s call entrainment the process whereby interaction with “something” brings a personality into being. Entrainment with silence is the process whereby the connection with the truth of the upper self can be maintained. Accepting the shadow is the process by which the gap between the personality and the truth of bodied and transbodied life is bridged.

(The thread which runs through all interactions can be made stronger than each. This seems to depend on parasympathetic dominance.)

Base chakra deities from yogic lore -- Indra, Brahma, Dakini. In China deities associate to organs instead.

In autohypnosis the entrainment is to the voice. But ‘voice’ has many meanings since people have more voice in them than they normally use and more is carried in the voice than words. People can talk differently if they know they are deeply listening. All entrainment works on inner archetypes which are known in all alchemical traditions. Multiple parts of us have a presence, associated with organs and chakras.

Shadow “acceptance” (including transformation through inhabitation and co-operation) has everything to do with really being in the body. So we know many normal entrainments take us out of it — why not, since we interpret things linguistically? Traumatic stress, which underlies much human dysfunction, is exclusion of now-experience from the body by the body’s own force. But when harmonised with that force things are very different. It does more than one dreamed when we are entrained to it, it to us.

Many people’s adult experience includes their personality and not much more. Life and society entrains them. Meta-entrainment, or entraining to that which continues despite entrainments, would mean re-entering the world that the social mind sucks us out of. Since society is ultimately a means of survival, the shadow is equivalent to death — that is, it is a byproduct of the instinctive attempt to avoid death — as is traumatic stress. The Stoics correctly taught that what survives death will not survive long unless harmonious tension and energy (pneuma or ch’i) is in place to amplify it. There is certainly a hole through which you can look to see beyond death, but to survive in that environment you have to entrain to it.

Some people’s belief systems prevent this which is itself the result of entrainment. Absolutism stems from Greek over-knifed logic, which makes everything too accurate and thus changes it. This is combined with Abrahamic over-faithiness where reality must be constantly overruled by wild attachment to a text-based “understanding” that we have to cheerlead as it “explains everything for our own good”.

The other day online someone saw what I said, put me into a category, and then demanded I defend the category! Desperately hitting out against himself in the form of a box containing my words that he had constructed, he went down slugging. Shadow.

Put the world on a Mandala and it acquires order and harmony with a centre.

Uprush of negative emotion sorts things into ‘good/bad’ categories which instead should be placed into a properly gradated worldview allowing quiet. (Mandalas place everything in a coordinated way to allow for this.) At any moment one may secede from the normal meanings. That world is not the last wor(l)d.

The ability to go within overrules everything else. Building the relationship with it makes freedom. It doesn’t change the world completely, but it changes your world completely. Most people seem too busy. Everything is listening including their own bones, but the conversation never begins.

Dionysus is connected with the esoteric Zagreus myth of being torn apart but then reborn -- click for more

Multiple selves are entrained by multiple external centres of interaction, but internal work unites them into a harmonious whole. It’s Empedocles, Dionysus, Osiris all over again.

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Anywhere is Everywhere
Anyone is Everyone
The world is a Tundra of Eachness

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Relaxercise -- beautiful movement exercises for wholeness

Benefit from this easy Feldenkrais, should you choose to. Been using it for years, a great secret weapon, Western move regimen, shadow “acceptance” through slowness. One more way to cancel out body-mind dualities that are especially vicious in the West, and the usual rubbish about needing to be someone else.

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He told her: “You have a mask.”
The patient replied: “You have a mask, too, Dr. Reich.”
He in turn said: “Yes, but the mask hasn’t me. “

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Next two weeks: inspiration and freedom.


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