Tag Archives: hypnosis

So far…

… everything checks out with this idea I’ve had. Lots of synchronicity happening too.

For those researching, note that the good people at ISSSEEM have just opened up their complete archives for free:

ISSSEEM ARCHIVE

… a ton of interesting stuff there.

Another very important and freely-available document is the late Ingo Swann’s history:

Remote Viewing — The Real Story

As the title suggests it’s about ESP, but incredibly perspicacious as well as great fun.


The delay is…

Andrew Jackson Davis — the “American Swedenborg”. All his visionary stuff was set off by initial contact with mesmeric trance.

… I’ve discovered things I need to work with actively. Some truly wonderful stuff, really has coalesced my view, brings a lot of things together. But is not conducive to me sitting and writing, my mind is in a completely different space.

I suppose I shouldn’t be surprised. I’ve been writing here for well over two years and I’ve been writing stuff that works, and so it’s worked. Especially with the recent research, which I thought was just historical, what I found was a new way of seeing. Now I’ve suddenly seen the most enormous link with hypnosis.

I should mention a bit more on how hypnosis fits the picture. Its importance is greater than most think. Hypnosis actually dovetails with chi kung, because of its foundation in Mesmerism. The records of those guys have things in that nobody is noticing. Everyone knows hypnosis works for all sorts of stuff like pain relief, and that it can awaken good stuff in the personality, etc. But a lot of people haven’t twigged that this happens because of different consciousnesses within the person that are contacted. This is all about the power of trance states and it goes right through the recent history of Western spirituality, as well as wider of course, in different forms, into shamanism etc.

Did you know:

– Edgar Cayce first went into his trances through hypnosis?

– Jane Roberts, of “Seth Material” fame, worked with hypnosis and recommended self-hypnotic procedures?

– Masters and Houston, looking to reproduce transpersonal effects of LSD, went to group hypnosis procedures in Mind Games (1972), and inspired the John Lennon song and album (great cover art)?

– Some of the simplest chi kung motions resemble those of the early mesmerists, which were sometimes used to build trances so strong that legs could be amputated painlessly?

– There are people showing science to the effect that the old mesmeric passes actually work?

Friederike Hauffe, the “Seeress of Prevorst”. Painting by Gabriel Max.

– Mesmerism too was linked with the visionary, that great seers mostly now forgotten, eg. the extraordinary Friederike Hauffe, worked with these procedures? (And of course all the psi/ESP imaginable, take that as read. But there’s more to this than just that.)

– Western mesmerists worked with tree energies? Here’s the “Puységur elm”, which early mesmerist the Marquis de Puységur worked with energetically. See those people holding ropes attached to the tree? They’re receiving energy from it for healing. (BTW, Check out Christine’s new blog for her work with plants, good stuff.)

Puységur’s magnetised elm.

Now put all that together and what have you got?

Obviously all this is just the tip of the iceberg. I’ve written before at various points about some of the stuff that this brings together now — eg. on entrainment, the overhead light, the normal, subconscious and superconscious mind, and so forth. And of course Kundalini.

Unfortunately it’s all clicked in a way that I can’t write about because I’ve got to work with it directly. I have to confirm what this is telling me. So right now I may have to stop writing altogether. I’m sorry about that, it is unexpected, but it may be the best way. Some of you know anyway that I’m not awfully comfortable online.


The very definition of “relevant”

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi recalling childhood experience of World War II:

As a child, I witnessed the dissolution of the smug world in which I had been comfortably ensconced. I noticed with surprise how many of the adults I had known as successful and self-confident became helpless and dispirited once the war removed their social supports. Without jobs, money, or status, they were reduced to empty shells. Yet there were a few who kept their integrity and purpose despite the surrounding chaos. Their serenity was a beacon that kept others from losing hope. And these were not the men and women one would have expected to emerge unscathed: they were not necessarily the most respected, better educated, or more skilled individuals. This experience set me thinking: what sources of strength were these people drawing on?

Now that is a good question, as the unpleasantly squirting shits of a rotgut technoswill society continue to play havoc with smugness in their degenerative storms. Luckily there are quite a few good answers. The second Havens/Walters hypno book I just mentioned last post has an approach to this called psychological hardiness — good term — that comes from some research at the University of Chicago, a subset of the general question of psychological resilience which is as important to individuals as physical resilience is to communities. I’m not saying I particularly like their definition, which is business-orientated, but once you start fooling with it…

(And by the way, the singular lack of psychological resilience in many isn’t at all unrelated to the total non-resilience of the culture.)

What I cheer in that book is the encapsulation of hardiness in a hypnosis script. I love occasionally finding someone doing things like that; again, this is how it should work. Maybe as a hypnotherapist I’ll offer trance to help with adaptation to peak oil too.

I suspect formless soul isn’t part of that theory though. Ronald Havens was and remains a materialist, a very nice and intelligent chap indeed from a couple of interactions I’ve had with him — loves his motorbikes — but one who works with a “cosmic consciousness” he thinks is in our heads! Yeah. (He did a book on that too BTW, it’s very good for what it is.) Catherine Walters of the golden voice has I think gone the more reiki-and-ascension route since co-writing with Havens, and that’s hardly me either… But any particular biases don’t mean the work won’t be generally useful, since it can always be adjusted.

Those in Csikszentmihalyi’s example who were only happy with jobs/money/status were empty shells all along anyway. He must have sensed their nature wasn’t changed by their fall in circumstance, but revealed. See that is how it works!

Answer to question why develop my own transpersonal application of hypnosis? Because what I’ve seen is just not very interesting. I look at most of the books and courses around, and it’s all blah blah anchoring, blah blah EFT, subpersonalities, addiction, blah blah healing pain relief, spirit release, past lives, blah blah Jungian archetypes. It’s good stuff if you’ve never encountered it, but not what I’d call transpersonal.

I’ve hardly seen anything in hypnosis (with the possible exception of Bernard Aaronson’s famous script for inducing void from 1969 — different era!) that even tries to look at that, and it’s not surprising because what’s involved is rather different from hypnosis as normally understood. As for something like this, I only hope it’s harmless, that’s all. This is the problem with a spiritual free market.

What is nice to see is some people resurrecting Mesmer in terms of energy hypnosis…


Hypnosis for all — I wish :)

So yes I do definitely still use hypnosis. And I’m working on ways to make it relevant all the way through enlightenment processes (something Glenn wanted to do) which is extremely interesting work, to put it mildly. My plans to practice hypnotherapy professionally got temporarily interrupted but will still fruit. Energetic and transpersonal effects seem to happen when I do it, by themselves, and thankfully there are a couple of resources to draw on.

Not everyone who would benefit from it gets to experience it. I plan to do what I can on that by giving low-cost treatments. Blog readers may get some free treatments from me this year too! I’ve got studio facilities and am working on audio hypnosis which I might make available in time; I will also do some free personal hypnosis sessions here in London eventually, perhaps putting together some sort of meetup as well as my practice, a talking shop.

If you want to get started in using hypnosis on yourself it still is good to get hypnotised at least once professionally first. All hypnotherapists will introduce you to the joys of self-hypnosis too, if requested.

I hate the selling in commercial hypnosis right now, the blather, waffle, mask-wearing and easy answers, nearly as much as the power-hungry “you too can make everyone else your slave” thing that you still see quite regularly. Believe me, the great pioneers of hypnosis were anything but soft-soapers.

But there are also people who know. The Havens/Walters book in the General Reading List is still a great start. I also recently found another book by the same authors that’s really interesting — ways to seed positive traits via hypnosis, eg. imagination, altruism, aesthetic and sensuous appreciation, meditative detachment and so forth. Very interesting, ways to stretch your humanity. That’s what we want!

I can’t help feeling that the usefulness of hypnosis is still not being fully exploited. It builds a relationship with the hidden that is so intimate and so effective, for those of us who easily respond to it. There is nothing like it.


[ego-statesquib]

I was poised to tie together the dissociation of last week with the entrainment of last month with the Lawrence LeShan-style multiple worldviews and polyparadigms of last year, when I realised: I haven’t yet summed up the state of the art on the ego states/subpersonalities/parts therapy for practical investigators.

These systems heal psychological issues by seeing the person as multiple selves. As in: “I hate it when I do that” — these two “I”s are different ego states in the same person; you go in and talk to the individual parts and they start to have room to breathe, form different beliefs, act/interact in new ways, and heal. It’s good for inner conflict resolution and it also handles trauma very well since trauma creates separate dissociated selves which can be healed and reintegrated. That’s what “straight” psych is doing with it, although it’s just the beginning…

There are various examples scattered through the Glenn corpus, eg. little Glennie and the oatmeal (Path Notes p. 148) or that interesting young guy in Martial Arts Madness (p. 144-5) who wisely says he doesn’t know “anything about anything”.

I talked about Internal Family Systems here well over a year ago now, but I love and now prefer the wonderful Ego States work of Emmerson based on the older work of Watkins/Watkins. Emmerson’s site is small but excellent — those powerpoints at the bottom are worth the time. I prefer Emmerson to IFS because he is looser and because he uses hypnosis which is fundamental to this approach for me. There are other ways to access trance states but contact with deep selves requires non-ordinary, non-social states.

Terence Watts is halfway between IFS and Emmerson since he uses hypnosis but sometimes has a limiting framework on parts. But his methods are often nicely improvisatory in practice. I haven’t yet looked at Roy Hunter’s version but it will of course also be heavily hypnosis dependent. Another way the hypnosis approach can go is Yager’s idea of allowing subpersonality work to be done out of sight, subliminally. You can do it his way, which is very active, but I also do it Erickson’s way, triggering generative creativity. Often with this type of hypnosis you just realise three weeks later things are different and it doesn’t feel like the hypnosis had anything to do with it, because the cause-effect is more synchronicitous than sequential.

Then there’s the excellent Developmental Needs Meeting Strategy of Shirley Jean Schmidt which resolves attachment issues by putting a resource base of strength in place, then using it to heal other parts. (In fact all these systems see elements in the psyche which are not simply regular states, but which organise or understand deeper purpose, taking you out of the horizontal plane. Of course that doesn’t lead to ‘enlightenment’ all by itself but it is important.)

Schmidt’s resource base ego state is built by entraining nurturance, protection and peak experience. Good states; could be added to Glenn’s Secret Smile of achievement, adult love, and fun. This resourceful self is then used to fulfil early needs of child subpersonalities.

This means that an idea from commenter AngelaN waaaaay back in November last year is confirmed — the Secret Smile can indeed meet attachment deficits. Particularly useful in Schmidt’s account is the mirror-neuron derived maladaptive introject, which seems to be solved pretty much as are introjects in Emmerson but the explanation is clever and has a lot of truth.

In addition there is a nice-looking new book by Novicks I haven’t read yet, and the older systems that use subpersonalities such as Psychosynthesis, Gestalt and TA remain relevant, although the latter again has a rigid limit on subpersonalities which doesn’t really work for me.

But anyway you see how much of this there is. I count 8 systems or 11 if you count three old ones in the last para. There’s something in this folks! To use it for transpersonal development you can soup it up.


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