[interestingtimesquib]

I’m a couple of weeks into my reading fast which will last a couple of weeks yet. As one would expect it’s causing me to work up quite a hunger, but I’ve noticed that my interests are changing and I’ll probably need to change the ‘About’ page to reflect that in time. I seem to have digested psychology and science in general for now (!) (^_^), although there will be the odd exception, and the coming thing is all about Greek philosophy and religion, especially Epicureanism, combined equally with Chinese traditions, especially Taoism, and with a side order of general cross-cultural religious/spiritual stuff. I’m looking forward to learning a little about the Mahasiddha tradition for example, wowee.

It’s an amazing time to be interested in these things because the scholarship is top-notch. I can’t believe you can just walk into Amazon and buy a copy of the Huainanzi in English! In particular what I like though is the library systems available in London, and my investigations will be much eased by joining the Hellenic Society in the near future. Yes I checked, they have the Philodemus book. :)

I was shown this guy in Denmark who is teaching a modern Epicureanism:

stressFREEDOMguide

… however he’s so hard line about it!

“Emotional well-being (aka happiness / eudaimonia) was the only subject taught in the Epicurean garden schools. For 800 years: from 300 BE to 500 CE. The Christian Emperors changed the topic for the next 1500 years: unhappiness has been taught in school ever since the cultural takeover by Church(es) and Platonic Academia…” so on, so on…

Not that he’d by my thing anyway since he’s “about as esoteric as a duck” (Glenn on a certain ninja, a rather quackist remark, he obviously never played Runequest which is a shame because it’s a good time to be a Jrusteli, but…) Seriously guys… why do you philosophers and religions fight all the time? Can’t peace be method as well as goal, as the man said? Can’t we all just love each other?

lol… never mind…

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5 responses to “[interestingtimesquib]

  • christine

    “About as esoteric as a duck” indeed – disappointing how sales-pitchy much of that site is. My hackles rise whenever I’m assured that if I just buy THIS book or THIS podcast, well, you know the rest. Just once in a while I’d like some “expert” to go around espousing radical notions like, oh I don’t know -” just stop thinking so much”, or “figure it out for yourself!”. So much of the search for wholeness is, I think, less about what we really need and more about what we’re sold on the idea of needing for our spirits…I suppose I come to this, now that I’m living amongst country folk, most of whom it seems, are probably quite Epicurean **naturally**. It’s refreshing and it teaches me so much after living in the city where many people pay big bucks for gurus to teach them how to “achieve simplicity”, (which is hilarious, or sad, depending on where you’re standing).

    Interesting, the name – stressFREEDOMguide. Perhaps if we could learn what FREEDOM means to each of us, stress could be used productively, as an impetus for change, rather than seen as something that we must escape?

    sigh

    • Jason Wingate

      eesh, I get you but honestly I wouldn’t sweat the guy… I held him up as a culturally interesting phenomenon not a sage figure. :)

      Just once in a while I’d like some “expert” to go around espousing radical notions like, oh I don’t know -” just stop thinking so much”, or “figure it out for yourself!”

      HAha yeah. I’d say if they don’t say that I’m out the door. Glenn used to say, go my way and you’re basically on your own. That said, I do like to absorb stuff like in the meridiansquib just now, which would be hard for me to work out from scratch. :) The stuff that has been laid down to mature over a millennium or two is worth having around; want pearls need oysters. :)

      Perhaps if we could learn what FREEDOM means to each of us, stress could be used productively, as an impetus for change, rather than seen as something that we must escape?

      Well I guess he meant needless or counterproductive stress — that’s all to do with where you are on the Yerkes-Dodson curve you know. :)

      Yes I’d say all good phil/psych etc. is seeking to return to the natural state, and everyone from Lao-tzu to Milton Erickson agrees you’ll start closer to it if you steer clear of cities — I’d add, especially what Spengler called late cities, that is, cities late in the decline of their civilisations, which defy the landscape, as well as nature reason and that distant memory, love. That would be every western city right now.

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