Holotropic Spontaneity and Carl Rogers XIV

— An outgrowth of Rogers’ work is that of his student Eugene Gendlin, whose ideas involve working in a Rogerian manner with bodily sensations — noticing, describing, coming to terms with the feelings and stories they naturally communicate. This can be very useful for people who do energy work and often tends to be part of the wider process anyway, but his book Focusing (1978), again written to be used without prior experience, whether alone or with a partner, is full of helpful detail and has been widely appreciated. It appears on Kundalini lists regularly.

— In case of strong or difficult stress of the kind we now call “traumatic”, I recommend a look at the work of Babette Rothschild or other trauma therapists. Since the physiology is very helpful for understanding Kundalini arousal too, it may be worth a look under any circumstances. The Body Remembers (2000) and The Body Remembers Casebook (2003) I found particularly good in their loose, physiologically-sound approach. This way teaches instantly accessible calm states with a variety of psychologies to clear traumatic ones. Knowledge of the physiology of trauma can come in handy even for things that appear quite minor. Rothschild has emphasised people are quite capable of getting over trauma by themselves.

Traumas are inevitably moments of full focus and strong awareness in our lives; they are also close to the Kundalini mechanism and can actually initiate it (see Kason). Meditation gradually brings these moments and their energetic/emotional/physiological results under control by being equally aware. Rothschild emphasises the all-important openness to process and describes very well the keys in the body and mind to getting out-of-control states back into harmony. This requires more care than the normal Gendlin Focusing as it involves knowing how to defuse mines without triggering them. Knowing the signs within the body can be very useful and will get put together with images, feelings, concepts, events, naturally by spontaneous Rogerian relationship.

— Stanislav Grof is very useful if you want to understand the nature of strange cognitions you’ve had, including ones in childhood. This was big for me and many people have some such memories or find them surfacing in meditation or self-enquiry. Getting a psychological handle on them makes them easier to process. See Realms of the Human Unconscious for example. Grof’s use of LSD proved there’s at least some value in it — more on exactly how much value in the next series. His ideas on what he calls COEX systems, too, in the same book, were very interesting and gave me some a-ha’s, although when it comes to dealing with them and the mind generally he is less interesting, as he doesn’t understand spiritual training. But that’s why we have chi kung.

If childhood was difficult and some parts of you seem permanently weird or irrational, another useful resource is the blog of Rodger Garrett, which shows the biology of this is now being understood quite clearly (limbic system inflammation plays a large role). The practices I’m giving here can heal this — his can too, he says. A great key is to understand just how much of this is physiology that can be resolved with work on the chi.

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