Tag Archives: acupressure

2 Connections to Bigger Patterns

Firstly, those following the wider process of death and rebirth that on a narrow level is currently playing out in Ukraine will probably be highly interested in this typically bravura lecture by Immanuel Wallerstein:

… since Ukraine currently exemplifies his “chaos” rather perfectly (its companion “bifurcation” is harder for me to swallow theoretically). Comparing the behaviour of this world system since 1945 with the one in Bali from the J. Stephen Lansing lecture I linked recently, I find it fascinating to see where they intersect. Competing myths. Wallerstein’s cycles of hegemony are bang on. He was turned onto systems by Prigogine. He and William Irwin Thompson might get on somewhat since they somewhat similarly see expansion and contraction.

(BTW the organisation Wallerstein mentions at around 31 mins is the Project for the New American Century — which I had somehow missed until now. Interesting!)

Secondly, and especially for those who haven’t yet looked at it, I’d like to speak again on behalf of acupressure. My fave books, as in the qigong reading list, are beginner-friendly, and there’s nothing like a little resilience and hardiness amidst all the world-system weirdness:

Acupressure’s Potent Points

Acupressure for Emotional Healing

I bring it up because of a scientific discovery which I’ve been meaning to post for ages. Over the last few years Joie Jones and Young Bae have actually been detecting the changes in stimulated acupoints using fMRI, and now they’re able to animate them on a screen so you can see them happening all along the meridian. EDIT: Sorry, forgot that the major breakthroughs actually involve ultrasound not fMRI. Jones demonstrates this here:

After you see, literally, the steadiness of the wave of chi moving through a meridian, you’ll never again wonder about the length of time you have to hold acupoints.

The connection again is self-organising systems. The meridians as a whole constitute one such system; acupressure, one way to adjust it. In order to link this with mythology and Kundalini you need a few more patterns. For now I’ll note that Carl Rogers-style psychology is about allowing self-organisation to occur. You yourself are a world, as the world-system is a world. Worlds interpenetrate.


Holotropic Spontaneity and Carl Rogers XII

The Rogers ideas go very well with many further approaches to fine-tune.

Obviously the addition of moving chi kung or yoga, or both — anything that harmonises chi/prana/energy and promotes healthy strength/flexibility — is wise, and for someone planning on awakening Kundalini should go without saying. But one does not have to be too serious at first. I have always learned best by playing, as psychology predicts. Natural additions are acupressure, Jin Shin Jyutsu, 6 Healing Sounds etc. Sources are on the Reading Lists. I’ve always enjoyed a little Feldenkrais, a system with very interesting points to make on body-mind connection. Having someone else work on you now and then can be good too. This kind of purgation and harmonisation does on the energetic level precisely what Rogers-style awareness does on the identity level — allows flow and builds integrity.

A lot of people seem not to want to believe that something as simple as acupressure can profoundly relieve, say, depression. Find your points and they will make the point better than I can, especially if you’ve developed a little chi. This process is partly about pleasure, as the body becomes more comfortable in everyday life. Without getting into Epicureanism again, pleasure of this, let’s say, unproblematic kind can be a very important signal and guide. Happiness is no mere snare, and all of these methods do actually inculcate it in my experience, especially when one thinks in terms of regularly lowering stress over a period of time.

A Rogerian attitude emphasises not over-extending oneself and really listening to the body. Expanding to bigger challenges (which of course increase satisfaction) only after one is comfortable is the way of the person without much to prove, as opposed to he who attempts to scare death off with perfect asanas and ligament blowouts. (This was Glenn’s advice in the “thanatos” chapters of Martial Arts Madness, 1999.) A good diet and time spent in nature are valuable.

Since this series will be my last featuring normal-level psychology in any major way, as I move into more mystical territory, I’ll give greater depth in these following posts on helpful psychological ideas to couple with Rogers on the journey. Various experiences (or whims) may arise which need a specialised approach, but I doubt most people will need everything on the list, and certainly not all at once! Apologies if it seems over-long, but I want to give as much as I can that I know has value. Something might jump out as interesting, now or later. All of this does connect to the Kundalini work and that will become very clear too. Meanwhile treat it as optional and remember it all works with Rogers. Room only for one this week with more to come over the next few posts.

— Herbert Benson, the discoverer of the Relaxation Response, later came up with the Breakout Principle (2004), which uses processes like meditation and other forms of awareness to trigger spontaneous inspirations and answers to just about anything, without conscious processing. Of all these approaches I highly recommend experimenting with this one at some point, since essentially it is holotropic spontaneity in action. Experiencing it in this context makes it very easy to trust that spontaneity as a general process. The method involves letting go. It triggers genuine and delightful moments of enlightenment which can even be peak experiences. It even has neurochemistry attached.

The book is suitable for complete beginners; see two previous posts here and here for more.

[It is interesting to contemplate, after having a few of these inspirations, that meeting with their source is a great goal of spiritual practice. But that deeper question must wait for future series.]